Sai wood art Panipat
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Sanoli Road Near bheem Goda Chowk Next wall to Goel Hospital Panipat
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     Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

Sanoli Road Near bheem Goda Chowk Next wall to Goel Hospital panipat

Parduman guliani = 9050510607

9813075040

E-Mail= gatsyarmaan@yahoo.com

       Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

                                        Deal in

Manufacturing all types of office and Home furniture items
Bad
Sofa
Tables
Dressing
Mandir

Also available Bad Mattresses

 Sai wood art Panipat

       Sai wood art Panipat

Furniture

Make your house a home with our wide range of beautiful furniture collections
Shop Sofas

                                 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

Department
Articles Furniture: New In Beds & Mattresses
Bedroom Furniture Sofas & Chairs
Dining Tables & Chairs TV Units, Brackets & Media Storage
Dressing Tables, Mirrors & Stools Children’s & Nursery Furniture
Office Desks & Chairs Wall Cabinets & Sink Units

  Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

Bathroom Furniture Tables
Pouffes, Ottomans & Footstools Jonas & James Furniture
Your Guide to Buying a Sofa Furnishing Your First Home
Guide to Choosing Wooden Furniture Guide to Buying a Mattress
Your Guide to Buying a Bed Guide to Buying a Children’s Bed
Guide to Choosing a Coffee Table Caring for your Leather Sofa
Your Guide to Buying a Headboard Furnishing your Home Office
Your Guide to Buying a Bed
Furnishing Your First Home
Your

A dining table with two chairs

An expandable table with chairs

                                  Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

 A couch unfolded into a bed

A couch unfolded into a bed

Sendai-dansu for kimono, zelkova wood, note the elaborate ironwork, handles on side for transportation, and lockable compartme

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

                  About us

A dining table with two chairs
Furniture refers to movable objects intended to support various human activities such as seating (e.g., chairs, stools, and sofas), eating (tables), and sleeping (e.g., beds). Furniture is also used to hold objects at a convenient height for work (as horizontal surfaces above the ground, such as tables and desks), or to store things (e.g., cupboards and shelves). Furniture can be a product of design and is considered a form of decorative art. In addition to furniture’s functional role, it can serve a symbolic or religious purpose. It can be made from many materials, including metal, plastic, and wood. Furniture can be made using a variety of woodworking joints which often reflect the local culture

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

People have been using natural objects, such as tree stumps, rocks and moss, as furniture since the beginning of human civilisation. Archaeological research shows that from around 30,000 years ago, people began constructing and carving their own furniture, using wood, stone, and animal bones. Early furniture from this period is known from artwork such as a Venus figurine found in Russia, depicting the goddess on a throne.

   Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The first surviving extant furniture is in the homes of Skara Brae in Scotland, and includes cupboards, dressers and beds all constructed from stone. Complex construction techniques such as joinery began in the early dynastic period of ancient Egypt. This era saw constructed wooden pieces, including stools and tables, sometimes decorated with valuable metals.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The evolution of furniture design continued in ancient Greece and ancient Rome, with thrones being commonplace as well as the klinai, multipurpose couches used for relaxing, eating, and sleeping.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The furniture of the Middle Ages was usually heavy, oak, and ornamented. Furniture design expanded during the Italian Renaissance of the fourteenth and fifteenth century. The seventeenth century, in both Southern and Northern Europe, was characterized by opulent, often gilded Baroque designs. The nineteenth century is usually defined by revival styles. The first three-quarters of the twentieth century are often seen as the march towards Modernism. One unique outgrowth of post-modern furniture design is a return to natural shapes and texture.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

Standards for design, functionality and safety

Installment by L. Gargantini for the Bolzano fair, 1957. Photo by Paolo Monti (Fondo Paolo Monti, BEIC).

  • EN 527 Office furniture – Work tables and desks
  • EN 1335 Office furniture – Office work chair
  • ANSI/BIFMA X 5.1 Office Seating
  • DIN 4551 Office furniture; revolving office chair with adjustable back with or without arm rests, adjustable in height
  • EN 581 Outdoor furniture – Seating and tables for camping, domestic and contract use
  • EN 1728:2014 Furniture – Seating – Test methods for the determination of strength and durability– updated in 2014.

     Sai wood art Panipat

    Sai wood art Panipat

     

  • EN 1730:2012 Furniture – Test methods for the determination of stability, strength and durability.
  • BS 4875 Furniture. Strength and stability of furniture. Methods for determination of stability of non-domestic storage furniture (British Standard)
  • EN 747 Furniture – Bunk beds and high beds – Test methods for the determination of stability, strength and durability
  • EN 13150 Workbenches for laboratories – Safety requirements and test methods
  • EN 1729 Educational furniture, chairs and tables for educational institutions[51]
  • RAL-GZ 430 Furniture standard from Germany
  • NEN 1812 Furniture standard from the Netherlands

     Sai wood art Panipat

    Sai wood art Panipat

  • GB 28007-2011 Children’s furniture – General technical requirements for children’s furniture designed and manufactured for children between 3 and 14 years old
  • BS 5852: 2006 Methods of test for assessment of the ignitability of upholsteling

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

  • EN 527 Office furniture – Work tables and desks
  • EN 1335 Office furniture – Office work chair
  • ANSI/BIFMA X 5.1 Office Seating
  • DIN 4551 Office furniture; revolving office chair with adjustable back with or without arm rests, adjustable in height
  • EN 581 Outdoor furniture – Seating and tables for camping, domestic and contract use
  • EN 1728:2014 Furniture – Seating – Test methods for the determination of strength and durability– updated in 2014.[50]
  • EN 1730:2012 Furniture – Test methods for the determination of stability, strength and durability.

BS 4875 Furniture. Strength and stability of furniture. Methods for determination of stability of non-domestic storage furniture (British Standard)

Sai wood art Panipat

 Sai wood art Panipat

 

  • EN 747 Furniture – Bunk beds and high beds – Test methods for the determination of stability, strength and durability
  • EN 13150 Workbenches for laboratories – Safety requirements and test methods
  • EN 1729 Educational furniture, chairs and tables for educational institutions[51]
  • RAL-GZ 430 Furniture standard from Germany
  • NEN 1812 Furniture standard from the Netherlands
  • GB 28007-2011 Children’s furniture – General technical requirements for children’s furniture designed and manufactured for children between 3 and 14 years old
  • BS 5852: 2006 Methods of test for assessment of the ignitability of upholstered seating by smouldering and flaming ignition sources

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

A dining table with two chairs

Furniture refers to movable objects intended to support various human activities such as seating (e.g., chairsstools, and sofas), eating (tables), and sleeping (e.g., beds). Furniture is also used to hold objects at a convenient height for work (as horizontal surfaces above the ground, such as tables and desks), or to store things (e.g., cupboards and shelves). Furniture can be a product of design and is considered a form of decorative art. In addition to furniture’s functional role, it can serve a symbolic or religious purpose. It can be made from many materials, including metal, plastic, and wood. Furniture can be made using a variety of woodworking jointswhich often reflect the local culture.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

People have been using natural objects, such as tree stumps, rocks and moss, as furniture since the beginning of human civilisation. Archaeological research shows that from around 30,000 years ago, people began constructing and carving their own furniture, using wood, stone, and animal bones. Early furniture from this period is known from artwork such as a Venus figurine found in Russia, depicting the goddess on a throne. The first surviving extant furniture is in the homes of Skara Brae in Scotland, and includes cupboards, dressers and beds all constructed from stone. Complex construction techniques such as joinerybegan in the early dynastic period of ancient Egypt. This era saw constructed wooden pieces, including stools and tables, sometimes decorated with valuable metals or ivory.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The evolution of furniture design continued in ancient Greece and ancient Rome, with thrones being commonplace as well as the klinai, multipurpose couches used for relaxing, eating, and sleeping. The furniture of the Middle Ages was usually heavy, oak, and ornamented. Furniture design expanded during the Italian Renaissance of the fourteenth and fifteenth century. The seventeenth century, in both Southern and Northern Europe, was characterized by opulent, often gilded Baroque designs.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The nineteenth century is usually defined by revival styles. The first three-quarters of the twentieth century are often seen as the march towards Modernism. One unique outgrowth of post-modern furniture design is a return to natural shapes and textual.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

The Basics:
• Devise a plan: Follow a measured drawing or a computer-generated blueprint.
• Consider form, function, and joinery: A design may look good on paper but lack basic strength and stability.
• When it doubt, mock it up: Full size or to scale, seeing a piece in three dimensions will solve many issues early on.

Devise a plan
Building furniture without plans is not unheard of, but it is not advised. It’s best to go into a project with a plan to follow. This will help you purchase the right amount of lumber, and it will help you head off many issues early in the process. A design can start out as a sketch on a napkin, but eventually it must be translated into something that can be used to create measured pieces.

Consider form, function, and joinery
Coming up with a design that looks nice is only part of the process. Ensuring strength and stability is the other. When designing a custom piece of furniture it is essential that you choose joinery that is strong enough to support the intended use. For example, a chair built with weak seat-to-leg joinery is probably not something you want to sit on. Consider the function of a piece, and make sure that the design accommodates it.

Furniture design may also follow a basic set of principles, such as the golden ratio, a naturally occurring mathematical formula that has been used to design everything from the Parthenon to the highboy. While these formulas can get you started, they don’t have to be the guiding force in the design process.

Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

When in doubt, mock it up
It is sometimes hard to truly understand a piece of furniture from a drawing. Even a three-quarter view doesn’t tell the whole story. Mockups, whether full size or to scale, can be a wonderful visual aid to help you refine a design.

 Sai wood art Panipat

Sai wood art Panipat

Little Tree Furniture Rushton Sideboard

The Rushton range is a contrast of contemporary design with a retro appeal made from solid reclaimed timber. The timber has the original paint markings
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